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, but the landscape is there now tells you that there was a creek they are. in other words, wherever there is a large sheet of land formerly in the city you'll find public or utilities, things considered at some point of lesser value. likewise since the creek on his story over at once was public housing, industrial warehouses, places where there's a ton of repair shops for taxicabs. the signs are written in numerous languages and also where people -- immigrants are storing their food carts. so it's a place -- that in itself, whereas the creek this practice wars come where things are constantly changing. new plants coming in constantly to nourish that saltmarsh gives us in the estuary. that is mimicked by the human settlement. so it still is a creek. i want to collect estuary i.t. of human development. there's this idea -- of course the city looks at these areas typically, especially in the last 10 years or so that this is an area that is not being used to its full potential. actually this is as if they were -- we were talking about college, but are trained creek is driving in the recently settled her
. >> was there a reason for that. it's typical in big cities, but communities that are rural, it's a little bit of a rarity. >> it's just the safety of our children is taken very seriously. it's a fairly large school between 500 and 600 students there. they want to keep control and know who is in the building with our children. >> i was talking to the state police and they said that they were processing the scene and children were still inside. how do you explain to their son whap about his classmate? >> we are a fairly religious family and we just talked about that they have gone to heaven. to be with jesus and that's about all we can say. we talk about you are not going to see them anymore and they are not going to be around. you really just struggle to find the words. >> you should know everyone is seng well wishes not just to you, but your community as a whole. so many people asked me to pass that along. >> we are a strong community. it is strong family community with a lot of love. we will get through it somehow, some way. >> let's go back to anderson. >> thank you very much. more now on s
&a." >> the white house was very controversial, as most planes in america were. the designer of washington city held a competition where he submitted a design from the palace. it was not particularly odd inspiring. in 1821 the european diplomats held a congress that was neither large nor all an inspiring, but the answer that the congressman gave said that the building served as a purpose. that if it were larger and more elegant, some president might be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> the former new york times kota critic has gathered some of her favorite white house photos in "the white house: the president's home and history." watch tonight on american history tv, c-span 3. >> monday, the ohio and west region yes secretary of state talked about the implementation of the voter id laws at the center for public policy. this is one hour. >> there are two sessions this afternoon. we have an end at 5:00 at the latest, so i want to get together as quickly as possible. this panel, we brought them together to talk about the issue of integrity. i do not think that we could do better than the pa
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5